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posted August 7, 2015

6 Reasons GLFF is Great!

Music and Dance!
50 + music and dance performances on 4 stages -- featuring varied genres ranging from French Creole, Tejano, and Bluegrass to Caribbean Steel Drum and Scottish Celtic, Indian, Gospel, and more. You won’t find a more fascinating, fantastic array of cultural traditions anywhere else!

Kidlore!
The Children’s Activity Area has hands-on traditional arts programming including basketry, Chinese paper cutting, and quilt making. Come learn, share, and pass on traditions.

Make Music!
Join us for the Uke Strum, Community Sing, and Old-time Jam. Gig with us!

Tradition Showcases!
The Great Lakes Folk Festival strives to not only present great traditions, techniques, musical influences, and special instruments, but to share with audiences. This year features fiddle traditions, and a special showcase on accordions, banjos, and bagpipes.

Campus and Community!
GLFF is a powerfully campus-community partnership. Explore the many ways universities turn education into action to solve programs and advance knowledge.

Volunteers!
More than 300 agile VOLUNTEERS assist the MSU Museum in staging the event - from artist transportation, children's activities, information booth, seniors on-the-go shuttles, site set-up and teardown, and visitor surveys.

 


posted August 6, 2015

The stage is set!
GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL SET-UP TRANSFORMS EAST LANSING

Tents, chairs, sound systems, stages, banners and booths are being installed today in preparation for the Great Lakes Folk Festival, a three-day celebration of culture, tradition and community produced by the Michigan State University Museum Aug. 7-9 in downtown East Lansing.

Work begins today on the Albert Avenue Dance Stage in downtown East Lansing. Motorists should be advised that some streets in downtown East Lansing will be blocked off beginning Friday morning.

Now in its fourteenth year, the Great Lakes Folk Festival features music and dance stages, authentic regional and ethnic foods, hand-made goods in the GLFF Marketplace, Michigan Heritage Awards, hands-on children’s area, exhibits and presentations – all showing how these cultural traditions are passed on and shared.

The festival begins Friday with a performance from Quebecois band Genticorum at 6 p.m. on the M.A.C. Stage. Admission is by donation.  For more information call the MSU Museum at (517) 432-GLFF.
 


posted August 5, 2015​

Festival facts: travel, transportation and what to bring!
GETTING TO THE GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL, AUG. 7-9

MSU MUSEUM, EAST LANSING, MI - East Lansing streets will be blocked off for the weekend of the Great Lakes Folk Festival.  Bring chairs, and some water and then be ready to soak up 21 hours of programming in music, dance, arts, and culture!

BIKE TO GLFF!
The Mid-Michigan Environmental Action Council will provide free guarded parking for festival-goers at a bike lot located at the corner of Albert Street and Abbot Road.

DRIVERS, NOTE:
For those who drive, the City of East Lansing has a number of parking ramps downtown.  Motorists can also park literally steps away from the festival, across the street on the MSU campus in designated spots that are free to the public on weekends (check posted signs).

ROAD CLOSURES:
The following roads will be closed for festival pedestrian traffic from Friday, Aug. 7 through Sunday, Aug. 9: Albert Avenue (corner of Albert Avenue and Charles Street); Grove Street (corner of Grove Street and Albert Avenue); Abbot Road (from Grand River Avenue to Oakhill); M.A.C. (from Albert to Linden). Motorists are advised to please find alternate routes for these roads on the days of the festival.

HANDICAPPED PARKING:
- City Hall – north lot
- Grove Street Ramp
- M.A.C north of the Marriott                           

SENIORS ON THE GO:
"Seniors on the Go" courtesy shuttles are also available to senior festival-goers on-site, at the information booths.

ACCESSIBILITY:
The Great Lakes Folk Festival is accessible to persons with disabilities. Wheelchairs are available at the main information booth. Schedules are available in Braille and large print by advance reservation.  Audio CDs with information about the festival are available by advance reservation. Call 432-GLFF (4533) to reserve schedules or audio CDs.

Note: the GLFF site is on CATA Route 1.

WHAT TO BRING:
Some of the stages and activity areas have chairs and are under tents to protect visitors and performers from rain drops or too much sun but visitors are advised to have an umbrella handy, bring sunscreen, wear a hat and bring a collapsible chair for seating.

The festival grounds are swirling with music and sounds, smells, and thousands of people situated in compact seating arrangements and crowded thoroughfares.  Summer heat can also be a factor for many pets.  Please be considerate of fellow festival attendees and your pets, and leave them at home.

 


posted August 3, 2015

MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival, Aug. 7-9
SPECIAL PROGRAMS HIGHLIGHTED: ARTS & HEALTH, QUILL WORK, AND THE CHINA EXPERIENCE

MSU Museum’s Great Lakes Folk Festival Aug. 7 - 9 in downtown East Lansing presents special curated traditional arts programs for the 14th annual festival. In addition to the always dynamic music and dance program, special programs also demonstrate the skill, wisdom and mastery of diverse cultural traditions.

“Masters of Tradition: Quillwork,” featuring NEA National Heritage Fellow Yvonne Walker Keschick, demonstrating porcupine quill box making.

“The China Experience: An MSU Exploration of Arts and Culture.” As part of the university-wide focus on China, festival goers can participate in Chinese Tea Traditions, and additional activities In the “Global Traditions, Local Connections” area coordinated by International Studies and Programs at MSU, including Chinese calligraphy, traditional clothing, and games!

Arts and Health: Attendees can learn about the intersections of arts and health through presentations on the Campus and Community stage and see exhibits including quilt & fiber art displays.

“Kidlore” Area
This year kids will have the opportunity for hands-on experiences inspired by the “The China Experience” and artists from the Michigan Traditional Arts Program including quilt making, basketry, and Chinese paper cutting.

“Marketplace” Area
31 vendors with recycled and upcycled green handmade goods!

Festival hours are: Friday, Aug. 7, 6 - 10:30 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 8, noon - 10:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 9, noon - 6 p.m. These special programs (marketplace, Kidlore, Global Traditions) run Saturday and Sunday, from 12 noon – 6 p.m., primarily along Abbot Road with an MSU Museum-curated exhibit, as well as with sessions and presentations on the Campus and Community Stage, near the intersection of Abbot and Albert roads. For more information, call the MSU Museum at (517) 432-GLFF (4533) or learn more at www.greatlakesfolkfest.net and on Facebook and Twitter (twitter.com/GLFF).

Meanwhile, the GLFF music and dance program features performances ranging from Scottish Celtic, bluegrass, Cajun, blues, Western Swing, Tejano, Caribbean Steel Drum and more. What sets this MSU Museum-produced event apart from many other festivals and fairs is the special fusion of culture, tradition and community that GLFF programs explore. Other GLFF program highlights include: 2015 Michigan Heritage Awards, honoring the state’s top tradition-bearers; and “Treasures from the Archive Roadshow: Celebrating Alan Lomax & The Folk Music Collections at the Library of Congress,” This roadshow draws together nationally recognized folk musicians who play songs from the Lomax Collection at the American Folklife Center. Also, on display at the MSU Museum through Oct. 18, 2015, “Michigan Folksong Legacy: Grand Discoveries from the Great Depression.”

The festival site — across the street from the MSU campus — spans the downtown core of the city for three days of festival fun. Admission is by donation. The Great Lakes Folk Festival is presented by the Michigan State University Museum, Michigan's first Smithsonian affiliate. The MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program researches, documents, preserves and presents our shared heritage and cultural expressions.

 


posted July 21, 2015

Volunteer at the Great Lakes Folk Festival!

T-shirt pick up events.  Also new volunteers can find out more about festival tasks

Wednesday, July 22 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. at the MSU Museum
Sunday, July 26 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at the East Lansing Farmer's Market
Thursday, July 30 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. at the MSU Museum
Sunday, August 2 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. at the East Lansing Farmer's Market

Monday, August 3 from 5:00p.m. until 7:00p.m. at Beggars Banquet.  This is the volunteer thank you party.  We hope all volunteers can drop by.

A corps of nearly 200 volunteers help produce this annual award-winning festival, a celebration of culture, tradition and community. Music and dance stages -- sponsored by the City of East Lansing -- feature rhythms, sounds, stories and spectacular musicianship over three days, from blues to bluegrass, Celtic, Zydeco, and more; a Taste of Traditions food court with authentic regional and ethnic cuisine; Children's Folk Activities Area, with hands-on fun for the whole family; and living arts and heritage programs that reflect on the MSU Museum's traditional arts research.

For information on volunteering, call (517) 432-GLFF or email glffvols@gmail.com

 


posted July 13, 2015

The preliminary schedule is now online! (schedule is subject to change)

 


posted June 30, 2015

2015 Great Lakes Folk Festival Poster Revealed!


Thanks to Ciesa Design for making this fantastic poster for the Great Lakes Folk Festival!

#GLFF: Great Lakes Folk Festival Community Photographs

New exhibit at the MSU Museum through Aug. 10, 2015! #GLFF highlights community photographs posted to social media during the 2014 Great Lakes Folk Festival. Together they reveal culture, tradition, and community at the core of the festival.

Kidlore: hands-on traditions and fun children's activities

Inspired by artist and traditions of the Michigan Traditional Arts Program and the thematic year at MSU, The China Experience: An Exploration of Arts and Culture, activities for children include: Chinese paper cutting, basket weaving, quill box making, and more!

Be Great, Volunteer!

The Michigan State University Museum is looking for volunteers to help at the Great Lakes Folk Festival (GLFF) Aug. 7-9 in downtown East Lansing register online here.

Please donate to GLFF to help ensure our high level of excellence in programming!

Your commitment at the Great Friends Erie Level ($100) or above lets you take advantage of participating in the wonderful Kick-Off Party hosted by the East Lansing Marriott! Go to the Great Lakes Folk Festival website and click on "donate!"

We truly appreciate your financial support and look forward to seeing you this August!


posted May 28, 2015

Roots, Rhythms, Richness!
MSU Museum’s 2015 Great Lakes Folk Festival is Aug. 7 – 9 in Downtown East Lansing

More artists just added:

Bob Bernard | Waltz Fiddle | Lake City, Mich.
Dennis Stroughmatt et L'Esprit Creole | French Creole | Albion, Ill.
*JUST ADDED! Desafio Norteño | Northern Style Tejano | Grant, Mich.
The Down Hill Strugglers | Old-time | Brooklyn, N.Y. 
*JUST ADDED! Feufollet | Cajun | Lafayette, La.
Genticorum | Québécois | Montreal, Canada
*JUST ADDED! Grupo Azteca | Tejano | Allen Park, Mich.
The Hot Club of Cowtown | Western Swing | Austin, Texas
Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton | Blues/Ragtime/Old-Time | Brooklyn, N.Y.
Joey Tomsick Orchestra | Cleveland Polka | Cleveland, Ohio
*JUST ADDED! Masters of Harmony | A Cappella Gospel | Detroit, Mich.
Newtown | Bluegrass | Lexington, Ky.
The Tannahill Weavers | Scottish Celtic | Paisley, Scotland
Tejano Sound Band | Tejano | Lansing, Mich.
Uprizin Steel Band | Caribbean Steel Drum | Warren, Mich.
Learn more here: Music and Dance Program

National Heritage Fellow!
Michigan's master quillworkers Yvonne Walker Keshick, and members of her family, are set to demonstrate porcupine quill box making at the Great Lakes Folk Festival.  Keshick, a member of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa, is a 1992 recipient of the Michigan Heritage Award, the state's highest honor for traditional-bearers who sustain cultural practices with excellence and authenticity.  In 2014 the National Endowment for the Arts awarded Keshick a National Heritage Fellowship, the nation's highest honor for folk and traditional arts.

Play Music With Us
Not only can you listen to great music from many different cultures at the Great Lakes Folk Festival, you can also make your own music!

Old-time jam, ukulele strum, shape note singing, and a community sing featuring Alan Lomax's popular songbooks led by Sally Potter and Seth Bernard and May Erlewine.

Give!
Please donate to GLFF to help ensure our high level of excellence in programming
Your commitment at the Great Friends Erie Level ($100) or above lets you take advantage of participating in the wonderful Kick-Off Party hosted by the East Lansing Marriott! Go to the Great Lakes Folk Festival website and click on "donate here!"
We truly appreciate your financial support and look forward to seeing you this August.

#GLFF: Great Lakes Folk Festival Community Photograph
New exhibit opening at the MSU Museum in mid- June! #GLFF highlights community photographs posted to social media during the 2014 Great Lakes Folk Festival. Together they reveal culture, tradition, and community at the core of the festival.


posted April 16, 2015

MSU MUSEUM ANNOUNCES 2015 MICHIGAN HERITAGE AWARDS, APPRENTICESHIP RECIPIENTS

MSU MUSEUM, EAST LANSING, MICH. – The Michigan State University Museum announces honorees in two programs celebrating heritage and culture in the state: the 2015 Michigan Heritage Awards (MHA), and the 2015 Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (MTAAP) recipients.

The Michigan Heritage Award (MHA) is the state's highest distinction to honor individuals who continue their family, community, and cultural traditions with excellence and devotion.

"The Michigan Heritage Awards are presented each year to honor master practitioners in Michigan who continue the folk traditions of their families and communities through practice and teaching," explains Marsha MacDowell, curator of folk arts at the MSU Museum and coordinator of the MHA program.

Receiving a 2015 Michigan Heritage award for their traditional arts achievements are: Ronald Ahrens, Three Oaks (Berrien County), for lacemaking; and Stephen Stier of Empire (Leelanau County), for historic barn preservation. The recipients of the 2015 Michigan Heritage Awards will be recognized at a public ceremony at the Great Lakes Folk Festival, produced Aug. 7-9 by the MSU Museum in downtown East Lansing. 

Since 1987, the MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (MTAAP) has supported the teaching and passing on of Michigan's cultural traditions by awarding grants to master artists and their apprentices. In this program, a master artist works with an apprentice artist for a period of eight months. Past apprenticeships have helped sustain traditions in diverse art forms such as fiddling, quill box making, storytelling, blacksmithing, tamale making and rag-rug weaving.  MTAAP master artists receive a monetary stipend for working with the apprentices in their specialized area of traditional arts.

The 2015 Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program's master artists and their apprentices, respectively, are:

- Bruce Bauman of Remus (Mecosta County) and Peggy Mohr of Harrison (Clare County), for old time fiddle;
- Anna Herman of Lansing (Ingham County) and Jill Plesko of Lansing (Ingham County), for fiber arts;
- Sam Herman of Lansing (Ingham County) and Micah Ling of Lansing (Ingham County), for old time banjo;
- Matt Kazmierski of Plymouth (Wayne County) and Alex Smith of Lansing (Ingham County), for
marimba building;
- Ron "Red" and Marcia LeClear of Shepherd (Isabella County) and Jennifer Hamp of Blanchard (Isabella County), for percussive dance;
- Ronald Paquin of Cheboygan (Cheboygan County) and Justin Carrick of Brimley (Chippewa County), for Anishnaabek birch bark containers;
- Sandra Scheel of West Branch (Ogemaw County) and Hilkka Ketola and Mia Lamminen of Howell (Livingston County) and Ann Arbor (Washtenaw County) respectively, for Finnish weaving;
- Roopa Shyamasundara of Rochester Hills (Oakland County) and Sruthi Ramesh of Troy (Oakland County), for Bharathanatyam (ancient Indian classical dance).

Performances and demonstrations by the Michigan Traditional Master Artists and their apprentices will take place at the Great Lakes Folk Festival this year, Aug. 7-9 in downtown East Lansing. http://www.greatlakesfolkfest.net/glff2015/ 

The Michigan Heritage Awards and Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program are supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The awards were given out following a thorough review by a statewide panel of folklife scholars and educators. The nominations were considered based on depth of experience, community engagement, representation of the tradition, samples of work, and the relationship between tradition-bearer and apprentice when determining the merit of each award.  Learn more here: http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/mtap or by contacting Marsha MacDowell, coordinator for MHA and MTAAP: macdowel@msu.edu or (517) 353-5526.


posted March 26, 2015

Culture-Community-Celebration
MSU MUSEUM’S 2015 GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL SET FOR AUG. 7-9

Where else in the world will you find French-Canadian, Celtic, Tejano, Creole and Western Swing? Throw in some 'Blind Boy' Blues, 'Uprizin' steel drum and 'Down Hill Strugglers' and it can only be the MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival, turning downtown East Lansing in to a living museum of roots, rhythms and richness Aug. 7-9.

The preliminary music and dance program includes:

-The Down Hill Strugglers | Old-Time | Brooklyn, N.Y.
- Genticorum | Québécois | Montreal, Canada
- The Hot Club of Cowtown | Western Swing | Austin, Texas
- Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton | Blues/Ragtime/Old-Time | Brooklyn, N. Y.
- Newtown | Bluegrass | Lexington, Ky.
- Dennis Stoughmatt et L'Esprit | French Creole | Albion, Ill.
- The Tannahill Weavers | Scottish Celtic | Paisley, Scotland
- Tejano Sound Band | Tejano | Lansing, Mich.
- Joey Tomsick | Cleveland Polka | Cleveland, Ohio
- Uprizin Steel Band | Caribbean Steel Drum | Warren, Mich.
Learn more here: Music and Dance Program

-Most groups play 2-4 times throughout the weekend, including sets on a 2,400-foot dance floor.
-Musicians from different groups take the stage in popular Traditions Showcases -- fiddlers, percussionists, accordion players -- to share and compare traditions and techniques of their instruments.
-Also, for festival-goers to participate: an old-time jam, community sing, and shape note singing.

A performance schedule will be set in July.

Exhibits, demonstrations, storytelling, marketplace, Kidlore children's folk activities, Taste of Traditions foodways, and Heritage Awards make the Great Lakes Festival a one-of-a-kind celebration of culture, tradition and community where visitors can sample and savor the distinctive cultural expressions throughout the festival weekend. Special programs for 2015 include:

Lomax Centennial: Celebrating Alan Lomax’s 100th Birthday
"Treasures from the Archive Roadshow: Celebrating Alan Lomax & The Folk Music Collections at the Library of Congress." This roadshow draws together nationally recognized folk musicians who play songs they have learned directly from the Lomax Collection and other important collections at the American Folklife Center. These performers will tour nationally during Lomax’s centennial year.

At GLFF the roadshow includes The Down Hill Strugglers with legendary musician and folklorist John Cohen (of the New Lost City Ramblers), Jerron “Blindboy” Paxton, Frank Fairfield, and Dom Flemons (formerly of the Carolina Chocolate Drops).

Michigan Folksong Legacy: Grand Discoveries from the Great Depression
Through Oct. 18, 2015, Heritage Gallery, Michigan State University Museum Exhibition bringing Alan Lomax's 1938 Michigan field trip to life through words, song lyrics, photographs, and sound recordings from Detroit to the Upper Peninsula including lumberjacks, miners, schoonermen, and more.

Community Sing: focus on Lomax's popular songbooks, which include songs like Goodnight Irene, House of the Rising Sun, Jesus is on the Mainline, and more!

The China Experience: An MSU Exploration of Arts & Culture
The China Experience is a university-wide thematic year that focuses on the arts and culture of China. For more information visit: artsandculture.msu.edu.

As part of the university wide focus on China GLFF has special China related activities led by Chinese students from the International Studies and Programs at MSU in the Global Traditions, Local Connections tent; activities will include traditional Chinese Calligraphy, games, clothing and more!

Arts and Health
Attendees will learn about arts and health through panel discussions on the Campus and Community stage and exhibits including quilt & fiber art displays and an Orphan Tower, comprised of beaded dolls representing the number of AIDS orphans in one South African village.

Great, Guaranteed!

2015 Michigan Heritage Awards
Each year at GLFF, the MSU Museum presents the Michigan Heritage Awards recognizing the state's leading tradition-bearers in music, material culture and community leadership. This year's honorees are: Ronald Ahrens, Three Oaks (Berrien County), for lacemaking; and Stephen Stier of Empire (Leelanau County), for historic barn preservation.

The GLFF Marketplace returns with more recycled and upcycled green goods, from jewelry to garden and fiber art, and sculpture. The MSU Museum also showcases master artists in textiles, basketry and other traditional arts. (Attention prospective vendors: apply at zapplication.org; search for MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival.)

Children’s Area ‘Kidlore’ Activities: Kids will have the opportunity for hands-on experiences inspired by the artists and traditions of the Michigan Traditional Arts Program (http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/mtap/).

Taste of Traditions Foodways: with authentic regional and ethnic food - Greek, Indian, Mexican, Thai and more.

The festival site -- across the street from the MSU campus -- spans the downtown core of the city for three days of festival fun. Find out more at http://greatlakesfolkfest.net or follow GLFF on facebook and twitter.

Festival fast facts:
Festival hours are: Friday, Aug. 7, 6 - 10:30 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 8, noon - 10:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 9, noon - 6 p.m. For more information, call the MSU Museum at (517) 432-GLFF (4533) or learn more at http://www.greatlakesfolkfest.net and on facebook (Great Lakes Folk Festival) and twitter (GLFF).

Admission is by donation (suggested $10 per day) and contributions leading up to the event and on-site -- sustain GLFF. Festival friends can make donations leading up to the event online at greatlakesfolkfest.net or at the MSU Museum. Make a donation now: https://commerce.cashnet.com/msu_3090_GLFF

Parking is available in downtown ramps and across Grand River Avenue on the MSU campus (in designated areas; free on weekends). GLFF also provides bike parking on-site.

More than 400 agile volunteers assist the MSU Museum in staging the event - from artist transportation, children's activities, information booth, site set-up and teardown, ice delivery and visitor surveys. To volunteer, see: http://www.greatlakesfolkfest.net/glff2015/?q=node/12

The Great Lakes Folk Festival is presented by the Michigan State University Museum, Michigan's first Smithsonian affiliate. The MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program researches, documents, preserves, and presents our shared heritage and cultural expressions. Primary financial support for GLFF comes from Michigan State University Office of the Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, the National Endowment for the Arts, the City of East Lansing, and many MSU departments. In addition, nearly 100 corporations, foundations and organizations also support GLFF annually, as well as individual donors, "Great Friends."

This award-winning event is one of the region's premiere arts programs and is expected to draw more than 90,000 visitors throughout the weekend to celebrate culture, tradition and community. GLFF was named the state's top public humanities program by the Michigan Humanities Council.

Double the festival fun!
It's a festival rich weekend in the Greater Lansing Area! The MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival and the Lansing JazzFest in Old Town will take over Mid-Michigan on the same weekend in August 2015. Traditionally JazzFest is the first weekend in August and GLFF is the second -- and depending on your interpretation and the quirk of how the dates fall this year, that is the weekend of Aug. 7 for both. Because of long-standing scheduling with artists and vendors, and working around the campus calendar and the lead-up to the MSU fall semester, GLFF is maintaining this weekend slot Aug. 7-9.

This won't happen again until 2020, so enjoy both festivals in one weekend for 2015! http://jazzlansing.com/ | Aug. 7-8 | Old Town

Arts and culture at Michigan State University
Arts and culture at MSU play a critical role in nurturing the human spirit while contributing to a richer quality of life. Museums, galleries, and gardens along with libraries, historic sites, and performance spaces provide a catalyst for cultural exchange of diverse ideas and inspirations. At the same time, audiences on campus and around the world take advantage of academic and research outreach programs such as public broadcasting, online resources, and publications. Learn more at http://artsandculture.msu.edu

 


posted August 6, 2014

 Share your Michigan Water Stories!
 
The Michigan Office of the Great Lakes has teamed up with Michigan State University Museum, Cranbrook Institute of Science, and the Kalamazoo Nature Center to inform conversations on water policy. The innovative Michigan Water Heritage Project is looking for Michiganders attending the Great Lakes Folk Festival to share their stories and experiences in a multi-generational dialogue about our water resources. Bring family or friends, and share your story about water, how you think about it, your concerns about the future of water resources, and what you want state government to do. What people believe, know, and feel is important to know in order to frame a better path for Michigan's Water Strategy!
 
*This project is funded in part by grants from the Erb Foundation and the Mott Foundation.

 


posted July 21, 2014

You can pick up your 2014 volunteer T shirt, ask questions about jobs or shifts or even walk in and register to volunteer at any of these 5 volunteer pick up events

Wed July 23 in the Senior Center at Hannah Community Center
Sun July 27 East Lansing Farmer's Market in Valley Court Park
Thurs July 31 in the Senior Center at Hannah Community Center
Sun Aug 3 East Lansing Farmer's Market in Valley Court Park

and

Mon Aug 4 at the Volunteer Event and Sign up at Beggar's Banquet (218 Abbot Road, East Lansing) from 5:30 p.m. until 7:30 p.m.  Food and soft drinks provided.  Adult beverages can be purchased from the bar.

 

posted July 15, 2014

Tibetan Buddhist Monks from the Gaden Shartse Dokhang Monastery

The Great Lakes Folk Festival is hosting Tibetan Buddhist monks from the Gaden Shartse Dokhang Monastery. While they are here they will be creating a sand mandala as well as performing a concert of chanting. The Gaden Shartse Dokhang Monastery, formerly in Tibet, is now based in southern India. The monastery is one of the three leading monastic and educational institutions for the Tibetan people and is actively working to preserve the culture, artistic and religious life of the Tibetan people. The monks are touring the US to share their culture and teachings, and to raise funds to build a prayer hall and dormitories, as well as monies for the medical needs of the monks residing at Gaden Shartse Dokhang. The tour is officially supported and blessed by His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Concert of Chanting
Campus and Community Stage, Sunday, Aug. 10 at 4:00 p.m.

The monks of Gaden Shartse Dokhang are renowned for their expertise in chanting. Not only are they expert at the more popular form of low toned chanting, they are specialists in a higher less known form of higher toned chanting as well. Other instruments will be played and the concert will also consist of some explanation of the chants, history, and tradition.

Sand Mandala
Ann Street Plaza
Saturday, Aug. 9 noon – 6 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 10 noon – 6 p.m.

Mandala means literally “that which extracts the essence.” There are many different types of mandalas used by Tibetan Buddhists. They can be created in either two or three dimensions. The ones on the monks’ tour will be two-dimensional sand mandalas. These are without doubt the most creative, labor intensive, and concentration intensive of all mandalas created. The mandala created at the Great Lakes Folk Festival will require two days of effort, completed by several monks at a time, including several Mandala Masters. Prayers are said throughout the making of the mandala. Traditionally, upon completion, the mandala is swept up and placed in a river, lake, or ocean as an offering to purify the surrounding environment. It is possible to make the mandala permanent.

 

posted June 6, 2014

 

Special Feature for 2014
Global Traditions, Local Connections

Coordinated by International Studies and Programs at MSU, join international students and community members in traditional activities from around the world. Drop in for paper folding, Chinese tea ceremonies, games and storytelling – or take in an international dance performance!

 

Showcasing Fiddle Traditions
New for 2014! Fiddle Focus

Over the years the festival has always had remarkable fiddlers representing traditions of music in many cultures around the world. Tradition showcases featuring fiddlers from different cultures or of different styles are typically some of the most popular showcases at the festival. This year's festival has a special focus on fiddle music because not only it is a favorite of festival goers, but also because the MSU Museum, the festival coordinator, is working with researchers around Michigan to investigate and document this state’s rich fiddle music tradition.

Learn about the history and social context of fiddle traditions with an emphasis on Michigan fiddlers.

Compare different styles and traditions of playing the fiddle.

Participate in a fiddle workshop.

More details coming soon!

click here for update to the Great Lakes Folk Festival's Music and Dance Program

posted May 27, 2014

MSU MUSEUM ANNOUNCES 2014 MICHIGAN HERITAGE AWARDS, APPRENTICESHIP RECIPIENTS

The Michigan State University Museum announces honorees in two programs celebrating heritage and culture in the state: the 2014 Michigan Heritage Awards (MHA), and the 2014 Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (MTAAP) recipients.

The Michigan Heritage Award is the state's highest distinction to honor individuals who continue their family community and cultural traditions with excellence and devotion.

"The Michigan Heritage Awards are presented each year to honor master practitioners in Michigan who continue the folk traditions of their families and communities through practice and teaching," explains Marsha MacDowell, curator of folk arts at the MSU Museum and coordinator of the MHA program.

Receiving a 2014 Michigan Heritage Award for their traditional arts achievements are: Karl Byarski, of Kinde (Huron County), for contributions in documenting and collecting of traditional music and stories in Michigan’s Thumb region; Danny Johnston, of Harbor Springs (Emmet County), for contributions in Michigan fiddling traditions; and Alan Lomax (Posthumous nomination), for Michigan oral histories and traditional music documentation.  The recipients of the 2014 Michigan Heritage Awards will be recognized at a public ceremony at the Great Lakes Folk Festival, produced Aug. 8-10 by the MSU Museum in downtown East Lansing. 

Since, 1987 the MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program has supported the teaching and passing on of Michigan's folk traditions by sponsoring master-artist apprentices. In this program, a master artist works with an apprentice artist for a period of eight months. Past apprenticeships have helped sustain traditions in diverse art forms such as fiddle playing, quill box making, storytelling, blacksmithing, tamale making and rag-rug weaving.  MTAAP master artists receive a monetary stipend for working with the apprentices in their specialized area of traditional arts.

The 2014 Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program's master artists and their apprentices, respectively, are:

- Paulette Brockington of Highland Park (Wayne County) and Terri Houlton of Warren (Macomb County), for partnered swing dance;

-Patricia Shackleton of Haslett (Ingham County) and Michelle "Micki" MacPherson of Sault Ste. Marie (Chippewa County), for Anishnaabek birch bark cutouts;

-Ron Paquin of Sault Ste. Marie (Chippewa County) and Christopher R. Paquinof Sault Ste. Marie (Chippewa County), for Anishnaabekbirch bark containers;

- Lula M. Williams of Detroit (Wayne County) and Pamela Day of Detroit (Wayne County), for quiltmaking.

-Sheila Ruby Graziano of Chelsea (Washtenaw County) and Alina Soltis of Saline (Washtenaw County), for clogging and traditional step dancing;

-Matt Kazmierski of Plymouth (Wayne County) and Alex Smith of Lansing (Ingham County), for marimba building;

-Marty Somberg of Saline (Washtenaw County) and Sheila Ruby Graziano of Chelsea (Washtenaw County), for old time and Irish fiddle;

- Susan Filipiak of Dexter (Washtenaw County) and Lydia Krienke of Ann Arbor (Washtenaw County), for percussive dance;

-Mike Ross of Bath (Clinton County) and Eli Strauss of Lansing (Ingham County), for old time fiddle.

Performances and demonstrations by the Michigan Traditional Artists and their apprentices will take place at the Great Lakes Folk Festival this year, Aug. 8-10 in downtown East Lansing.

The Michigan Heritage Awards and Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program are supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The awards were based on review by a statewide panel of folklife scholars and educators who consider all the nominations and look for depth of experience, outreach, and authenticity of the tradition and the tradition-bearer when determining the merit of each award.  Learn more here: http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/mtap  or by contacting Marsha MacDowell, coordinator for MHA and MTAAP: macdowel@msu.edu or 517-353-5526.

 

 

posted April 14, 2014

Save the Date!
MSU MUSEUM'S 2014 GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL IS AUG. 8-10 in Downtown East Lansing

The preliminary music and dance program includes
-Paulette Brockington | Swing Dance and the Lindy Hop | Highland Park, Mich.
-Thornetta Davis | Blues | Detroit, Mich.
-Detour | Bluegrass | Brethren, Mich.
-Girsa | Irish Celtic | Pearl River, N.Y.
-Golden Griffon Stringtet | Contra/Square Dance | Romulus, Mich.
-Lisa Haley & The Zydekats | Zydeco | Lawndale, Calif.
-Heartland Klezmorim | Klezmer | East Lansing, Mich.
-Maria and Yahví | Mariachi/Son Jarocho/Soon Caletano | Minnesota and Chicago
-Thomas Maupin, Danny Rothwell & Overall Creek | Old-Time/ Buck Dancing | Smyrna, Tenn.
-Arlene McDaniel Quartet | Swing Jazz | East Lansing, Mich.
-Trae McMaken | Old-Time Fiddle | Johnson City, Tenn.
-Jerry Minar | Polka Accordion | New Prague, Minn.
 

-Most groups play 2-4 times throughout the weekend, including sets on a 2,400-foot dance floor.
-Musicians from different groups take the stage in popular Traditions Showcases -- fiddlers, percussionists, and accordion players -- to share and compare traditions and techniques of their instruments.
-Also, for festival-goers to participate: a musicians' jam, community sing and ukulele jam.

A performance schedule will be set in July.

*NEW* Global Traditions, Local Connections - coordinated by International Studies and Programs at MSU will feature international students at MSU and Greater Lansing Area Residents demonstrating and leading traditional hands-on activities from around the world, drop-in programs include: games unplugged, authentic music and arts, and community folklife traditions and activities.

Great Lakes meets Midwest -- at the East Lansing epicenter
A special feature for 2014: GLFF plays host for the second time to the 14th annual traveling Midwest Folklife Festival, a free outdoor public festival that highlights the ethnic and folk arts, customs, and practices of the Midwestern states. (See: Midwest Folk Life Festival for updates.)

2014 Michigan Heritage Awards
Each year at GLFF, the MSU Museum presents the Michigan Heritage Awards recognizing the state's leading tradition-bearers in music, material culture and community leadership. This year's honorees are: Karl Byarski of Kinde (Huron County), for documenting and collecting of traditional music and stories of Michigan?s Thumb region, Danny Johnston of Harbor Springs (Emmet County), for Michigan fiddling traditions, and Alan Lomax (Posthumous nomination), for Michigan oral histories and traditional music documentation.

Also on tap
The GLFF Marketplace returns with more recycled and upcycled green goods, from jewelry to garden and fiber art, and sculpture. The MSU Museum also showcases master artists in textiles, basketry and other traditional arts. (Attention prospective vendors: apply at zapplication.org; search for MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival.)

Kidlore: Children's activities include making traditional kids' crafts, games and pastimes, gardening projects, demonstrations by youth folk apprentices, MSU campus lore and traditions and more.

Taste of Traditions Foodways: with authentic regional and ethnic food - Greek, Indian, Mexican, Thai and more.

The award-winning Great Lakes Folk Festival, produced by the MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program, is a celebration of culture, tradition and community. The Michigan State University Museum works year-round to develop this festival program that reflects the immense variety and vitality of art, skill, knowledge, and wisdom of our cultural heritage for the public. GLFF offers a one-of-a-kind mix of music and dance stages, demonstrations of traditional arts and storytelling, authentic ethnic food, an arts marketplace, craft artists, and many special activities for kids and their companions.

Festive News
The local American Advertising Federation (Mid-Michigan Creative Alliance) awarded the 2013 Great Lakes Folk Festival poster with a gold award! Thanks to the design direction of Kevin Liuzzo and the design of Kendra Church at Ceisa Design.

New exhibit on view at the MSU Museum: The Folk Festival: A Hands-On MSU Museum Tradition open now through August 24. This new exhibition features a photographic history of MSU Museum festivals starting in 1987, to the National Folk Festival in 1999 - 2001, right up to the most recent Great Lakes Folk Festival.

Follow our Great Folks blog! - Expanding the community of tradition bearers and those who want to learn more about the music, stories, dance, foodways, art, and cultural heritage of Michigan and beyond.

Donate!

Volunteer!

facebook: MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival
twitter: @GLFF

####

 

posted Aug. 9, 2013

GLFF KICKS OFF FRIDAY, AUG. 9 with QUÉBÉCOIS at M.A.C. STAGE!

 
GLFF KICKS OFF FRIDAY, AUG. 9 with QUÉBÉCOIS at M.A.C. STAGE!

Join us Friday, Aug. 9, at 6 p.m. at the M.A.C. Stage as the festival kicks off with spirited French-Canadian music from Les Poules à Colin! Next up will be Lanialoha and Aloha Lives! ukulele and hula at the City Hall Stage and Slovenian polka with Johnny Koenig at the Dance Stage.

Friday night features an outstanding array of old-time strings, Finnish-American, Chicago and Memphis blues, Cajun, Hmong, Cuban-Caribbean and bluegrass. And that's just Friday! Come back Saturday and Sunday for more roots and rhythms!

The Taste of Traditions foodways vendors will be open Friday night as well with authentic regional and ethnic food.

Marketplace and Kidlore children's activities are in full swing beginning at 12 noon Saturday and Sunday, anchored at the Albert-Abbot intersection -- along with our "Campus and Community" exhibits and presentations.

 

MAKE MUSIC, DANCE WITH US!

Community Sing: 3-4:30 p.m., Saturday, City Hall Stage

Swing Demo, Workshop and Dance: 4:30 - 6:30, Saturday, Dance Stage

Old-Time Music Jam: 5-7 p.m., Saturday, Campus & Community Stage

Ukulele Jam: 12 noon, Sunday, Campus & Community Stage

 

Get the schedule here (also available for mobile devices):

[The schedule may be subject to change.]

-->New opportunity, uke workshop Sunday morning before GLFF opens ($ registration fee)

 

LOOKING FOR #LOVELANSING VOLUNTEERS!  

We are still looking for volunteers to help fill slots to help produce this large-scale community event!

 

HONORING TRADITION-BEARERS:

Each year at GLFF, the MSU Museum presents the Michigan Heritage Awards recognizing the state's leading tradition-bearers in music, material culture and community leadership. This year's honorees are: Wesley V. Cooper of Fremont, a bamboo fly rod maker, and Carlson's of Fishtown in Leland, a Great Lakes heritage commercial fishery.

The Michigan Heritage Awards Program is on Sunday, Aug. 11 at 3:30 at the Campus & Community Stage.

 

BE SOCIAL: CHECK IN ON FOURSQUARE HERE!

TWEET ABOUT #GLFF!

For those of you on Twitter, tell us what you like, where you're from and other observations, pictures and festival tips! Use the hashtag #GLFF and we'll retweet them throughout the weekend.

GETTING THERE:

BIKE TO GLFF!

With soaring gas prices, now may be a better time to ditch the car and bike to GLFF with free guarded parking for festival-goers at a bike lot located at the corner of Albert Street and Abbot Road.

DRIVERS, NOTE:
For those who drive, the City of East Lansing has a number of parking ramps downtown.  Motorists can also park literally steps away from the festival, across the street on the MSU campus in designated spots that are free to the public on weekends (check posted signs).

ROAD CLOSURES:

The following roads will be closed for festival pedestrian traffic from Friday, Aug. 9 through Sunday, Aug. 11: Albert Avenue (corner of Albert Avenue and Charles Street); Grove Street (corner of Grove Street and Albert Avenue); Abbot Road (from Grand River Avenue to Oakhill); M.A.C. (from Albert to Linden). Motorists are advised to please find alternate routes for these roads on the days of the festival.

PARKING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES:

- City Hall - north lot
- Grove Street Ramp

- M.A.C north of the Marriott                          

ACCESSIBILITY:
The Great Lakes Folk Festival is accessible to persons with disabilities. Wheelchairs are available at the main information booth. Schedules are available in Braille and large print by advance reservation.  Audio CDs with information about the festival are available by advance reservation. Call 432-GLFF (4533) to reserve schedules or audio CDs.

 

SENIORS ON THE GO:

"Seniors on the Go" courtesy shuttles are also available to senior festival-goers on-site, at the information booths.

Note: There is no CATA park and ride program, however the GLFF site is on CATA Route 1.

TAKE OUR FESTIVAL SURVEY:

Please take a moment to fill out a GLFF festival survey to help us evaluate and plan for future events. We will have volunteers on-site!

 

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS!
Producing the Great Lakes Folk Festival is a year-round undertaking and relies on an aggressive mix of university and city support, grants, corporations, foundations and friends. Thanks to all who have donated so we can enjoy another successful year. Look for our dedicated Bucket Brigade on-site and please give. [Suggested daily donation is $10 per person, per day.]

Give online:

click on Donate Here!

Or drop off a check at the MSU Museum, 409 W. Circle Drive, on the MSU campus next to Beaumont Tower and across from the Main Library.

PROGRAMS GO ON RAIN OR SHINE

Most programs are under tented areas, so the event goes on rain or shine (except in the event of severe weather).

The Great Lakes Folk Festival is presented by the Michigan State University Museum, Michigan's first Smithsonian affiliate.

posted Aug. 2, 2013
 

Just added:
Ukulele workshop, Sunday, Aug. 11 (10 a.m. -- before GLFF opens) 

When: Sunday, August 11, 10:00-11:00 a.m.
Where: Room off of the lobby in the East Lansing Marriott
Cost: $25
Enroll here at this secure site. There are limited spaces available so we encourage you to sign up ahead!

*There will be an ukulele jam in the Campus and Community Tent at 12:00 on Sunday led by Lanialoha and Ben Hassenger! Stick around!

Details:

Workshop opportunity to learn South Pacific island styles of ukulele music from master ukulele artist Carole Lanialoha Lee-Sumberg who will be performing at the 2013 Great Lakes Folk Festival. This workshop learning is coordinated by the Michigan
Traditional Arts Program/Michigan State University Museum in collaboration with the MSU Community Music School.

A fun, challenging workshop in which Lanialoha aims to “empower you to embrace hands-on ukulele exercises that establish a good foundation of basics and provide techniques for a variety of strumming styles."

Her workshop showcases the powerful strums characteristic of South Pacific island cultures, includes clever mnemonic devices
for remembering various strum names, and is infused with culturally enriching stories of kūpuna (elders) and their aloha for traditional music. She also introduces new Hawaiian music of younger generations and, in doing so, hopes to strengthen bridges between the Midwest and Hawai`i.

Handouts and supplemental materials will be provided.

 

 

 

posted July 29, 2013

posted July 26, 2013

VOLUNTEER AT THE GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL AUG. 9-11

This year's Great Lakes Folk Festival is now less than three weeks away.  Our wonderful volunteers are an important part of this event, and we still need lots of them! If you're going to be in the area August 9, 10, and 11 this year, we would love to have you volunteer. There are still vacancies in all of our areas (including popular ones like transportation and CD sales!).

Sign up using our online registration form, which can be found here.   

Register in person at one of our drop-in orientation/T-shirt pick-up dates:
-Sunday, July 28, 10:00 am-2:00 pm, East Lansing Farmer's Market
-Wednesday, July 31, 5:00-7:30, Hannah Community Center
-Sunday, August 4, 10:00 am-2:00 pm, East Lansing Farmer's Market

 

posted July 18, 2013

GLFF Schedule Posted Online!

This just in: the GLFF performance schedule has been posted!
We always call this a tentative schedule as we continue to fine-tune for a weekend where we keep our artists busy -- music sets on multiple stages, quick change-overs, and special showcase performances with artists from different groups!

Again this year, we are using the SCHED event organizer system, which offers grid view and venue views, and works for desktop, mobile and printing.

Check it out here!

LISTEN TO THE ROOTS AND RHYTHMS: MUSIC SAMPLES ONLINE

For newly posted musician bios and short music clips, featuring our fantastic line-up of musical traditions, including blues to bluegrass, Cuban-Caribbean, Celtic, Cajun, Québécois, Balkan, Hmong, polka and more roots and rhythm check out the music and dance program page.

BEST OF THE MIDWEST
This year, the MSU Museum and Great Lakes Folk Festival play host to the traveling Midwest Folklife Festival, with a special program featuring Best of the Midwest music and material culture.

Find out more!

BE GREAT, VOLUNTEER!
The Michigan State University Museum is looking for volunteers to help at the Great Lakes Folk Festival (GLFF) Aug. 9-11 in downtown East Lansing.
Volunteer positions include festival set-up and takedown, bike parking, assisting in the children's area, staffing the information booth and GLFF marketplace, and collecting donations in the "bucket brigade." Most volunteer shifts are three hours long.
For more information on positions and volunteering, visit the Great Lakes Folk Festival's volunteer page.
or email glffvolunteer@museum.msu.edu.

GIVE!
Please donate to help sustain our folk festival programs! We depend on a diverse mix of funding -- from national and state grants, to MSU departments, to businesses and corporate partnerships, and Great Friends, like you!
Make a gift online.

Be a Friend of the Festival at the $100 level and join us for a spectacular Kick-off Party on Friday, Aug. 9, 4:30 - 6 in the East Lansing Marriott.

 

 

posted June 27, 2013

MSU Museum Announces 2013 Michigan Heritage Awards, Apprenticeship Recipients

The Michigan State University Museum announces honorees in two programs celebrating heritage and culture in the state: the 2013 Michigan Heritage Awards (MHA), and the 2013 Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (MTAAP) recipients.

The Michigan Heritage Award is the state's highest distinction to honor individuals who continue their family community and cultural traditions with excellence and devotion.

"The Michigan Heritage Awards are presented each year to honor master practitioners in Michigan who continue the folk traditions of their families and communities through practice and teaching," explains Marsha MacDowell, curator of folk arts at the MSU Museum and coordinator of the MHA program.

Receiving a 2013 Michigan Heritage Award for their traditional arts achievements are: Carlson’s of Fishtown, of Leland (Leelanau County), for contributions in occupational folklife, Great Lakes commercial fishing and fish processing; and Wesley V. Cooper, of Fremont (Newaygo County), for bamboo fishing rod-making.  The recipients of the 2013 Michigan Heritage Awards will be recognized at a public ceremony at the Great Lakes Folk Festival.

Since, 1987 the MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program has supported the teaching and passing on of Michigan's folk traditions by sponsoring master-artist apprentices. In this program, a master artist works with an apprentice artist for a period of eight months. Past apprenticeships have helped sustain traditions in diverse art forms such as fiddle playing, quill box making, storytelling, blacksmithing, tamale making and rag-rug weaving.  MTAAP master artists receive a monetary stipend for working with the apprentices in their specialized area of traditional arts.

The 2013 Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program's master artists and their apprentices, respectively, are:

-James Anderson of Gladwin, (Gladwin County) and Christain Horendo of Holbrook, NY and Gladwin, for stone carving;

-Paulette Brockington of Highland Park (Wayne County) and Cherisse Bradley of Flint (Genesee County), for Lindy hop and swing dance

- Renée "Wasson" Dillard  of Harbor Springs (Emmet County) and Nicole E. Massey of Brutus (Emmet County), for Native American black ash baskets;

- John E. Pigeon of Wayland (Allegan County) and John M. Pigeon of Wayland (Allegan County), for black ash traditional Potawatomi arts;

- Sheila Ruby Graziano of Chelsea (Washington County) and Meredith Brown of Ypsilanti (Washtenaw County), for clogging and traditional step dancing;

-Timothy Higgins of Elsie (Clinton County) and Sam Pettersen of Elsie (Clinton County), for metalsmith arts;

-Peter “Pekka” A. Olson of Chassell (Houghton County) and Jennifer Miller of Pelkie (Baraga County), for Finnish American woodcarving and basketry;

- Patricia Shackleton of Haslett (Ingham County) and Michelle "Micki" MacPherson and of Sault Ste. Marie (Chippewa County), for Anishnaabek birch bark cutouts;

- Lula M. Williams of Detroit (Wayne County) and Pamela Day of Detroit (Wayne County), for quiltmaking.

Performances and demonstrations by the Michigan Traditional Artists and their apprentices will take place at the Great Lakes Folk Festival this year. 

The Michigan Heritage Awards and Michigan Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program are supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The awards were based on review by a statewide panel of folklife scholars and educators who consider all the nominations and look for depth of experience, outreach, and authenticity of the tradition and the tradition-bearer when determining the merit of each award.  Learn more here: http://museum.msu.edu/s-program/mtap  or by contacting Marsha MacDowell, coordinator for MHA and MTAAP: macdowel@msu.edu

posted June 12, 2013

FIRST WAVE OF MARKETPLACE VENDORS ANNOUNCED

Festival Visitors will have an opportunity to purchase fun and creative objects and support local folks in the Marketplace. Below is a list of artists planning to be at the Great Lakes Folk Festival.

 

Molly Mulvaney and Hannah Arnould, Nyaka AIDS Orphans Project  - paper bead necklaces and woven baskets

Jo Hoffacker, Dogmaw Glass – recycled wearable art and accessories

April Bates – surface design on recycled clothing

Mike and Val Leedom, Stumpkins – garden sculpture

KC Khirfan, Papercrane Studios – jewelry from vintage and found objects

Nicole Drysdale, The Little Craft Closet – jewelry and accessories from vintage and found objects

Oletha Haller, St. Stephen's Community Church – traditional aprons

Kris Khan, Kris Khan Designs – quilts

Kenneth Yang, The Beauty of Pandau – Hmong textiles

Hannah Lipsey and Rachel Kingsley, Mumre – embroidery and watercolors

Victoria Widman – upcycled leather goods

Rob and Cindy Rhoton, C R Stuff – woven seagrass hats

Rafiu Mustapha, rafremi.eises – recycled aluminum

 

 

posted May 24, 2013

 

MSU MUSEUM’S 2013 GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL ADDS MORE MUSICAL ARTISTS

Blues, Old-Time Strings and Balkan music traditions have been added to the lineup for the MSU Museum’s Great Lakes Folk Festival, Aug. 9-11 in downtown East Lansing.

New additions are:
-Mike Espy & Yakity Yak | Delta Blues | Fenton, Mich.
-Joel Mabus | Old-Time Strings | Portage, Mich.
-Red Tail Ring/Bowhunter | Old- Time String Band and Contra Dance | Kalamazoo, Mich.
-Svetla Vladeva and the Eastern European Ensemble | Balkan Music | Bloomington, Ind.

See the full lineup here. 

 

posted May 14, 2013

MSU MUSEUM RECEIVES MICH. HUMANITIES COUNCIL GRANT FOR GLFF PROGRAM

 

On May 9, the Michigan Humanities Council (MHC) Board of Directors approved funding for the spring 2013 major grants cycle. MHC received a total of 71 eligible applications for this cycle. Of those, 26 have been approved for a total award of $300,417. Those grantees will leverage an additional $910,281.

MHC major grants are awarded on an annual basis to Michigan nonprofits in support of cultural, educational and community-based public humanities programming. These grants play a vital role in defining our culture, our state, our community and ourselves, and are intended to connect us to Michigan’s rich cultural heritage and historical resources. The maximum major grant award is $15,000. For interested applicants, the next cycle will be in the spring of 2014.

The MSU Museum was among three recipients of grants in Ingham County:

Library of Michigan - $15,000

Michigan State University – School of Journalism - $14,783

Michigan State University Museum - $14,980

The Michigan State University Museum will create a multimedia program and performance tour commemorating the 75th anniversary of American folklorist Alan Lomax’s historic field collecting trip in Michigan. The tour program will highlight the remarkable legacy of Lomax’s trip and introduce Michigan audiences to this material (newly digitized and made widely accessible for the first time) through an event that integrates live performance of repertoire from the field trip along with a program featuring American and Michigan folklore scholarship, ethnic and cultural history, film footage, audio recordings, and manuscripts from the collection.

The commemoration will launch with presentations in June at FinnFest 2013, located in Hancock, Michigan -- site of the initial public showing of Lomax’s film footage -- and an inaugural performance and program Aug. 9-11 at the MSU Museum's  Great Lakes Folk Festival in East Lansing. Between August 2013 and May 31, 2014, additional tour stops include sites close by where Lomax made significant field recordings: Clarke Historical Library, Mount Pleasant (lumberjack lore); Beaver Island Community Center (Irish and Great Lakes ballads and fiddling); Dennos Museum, Traverse City (ballads); Rogers City Community Theater (Polish songs); St. Ignace Public Library (maritime lore), and the NMU Beaumier Upper Peninsula Heritage Center, Marquette (Finnish and French-Canadian lore).

The Association for Cultural Equity and the American Folklife Center/Library of Congress are partnering with MSU Museum by digitizing and curating the Lomax Michigan collection, and by coordinating other related commemorative events.

About the Michigan Humanities Council
The Michigan Humanities Council is a private, nonprofit organization created to foster a better understanding of each other and our state through local cultural, historical and literary experiences for all. The Council was founded in 1974 and is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and individual donors.

 

 

posted May 6, 2013

 

MSU Museum’s GLFF Marketplace, Aug. 10 & 11
GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL MARKETPLACE: CALL FOR VENDORS

 

Hand-made goods with folk wisdom and functionality will be featured at the MSU Museum’s Great Lakes Folk Festival, Aug. 10 and 11 in downtown East Lansing.

Interested vendors should go to zapplication.org and search for MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival. ZAPP is an online application system that allows artists to upload high-resolution digital images of their artwork and apply to participating art shows, festivals, and fairs.  The application deadline is July 18, 2013.

GLFF MarketplaceJuried by the MSU Museum staff, the marketplace will be expanded to 60 vendors who specialize in traditional/folk or green artist.  Folk or traditional art is generally learned by example from a family or community member, through imitation and repetition, rather than through formal instruction such as classes or workshops. Traditional art, as practiced by ethnic, regional, occupational, familial, and religious groups, refers to the traditional expressions through which these communities maintain and pass on their shared sense of beauty, identity, and values.  Green artists take used or recycled materials and upcycle them to make art or functional objects. The products convey the artists' wisdom, skill and creativity for conserving the planet and using materials in a sometimes recognizable, and sometimes surprising way.

GLFF runs Aug. 9-11 and marketplace hours are Saturday, Aug. 10, noon - 6:00 p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 11, noon - 6 p.m. For more information please contact Riley Ravary (ravaryri@msu.edu) or Lynne Swanson (swansonl@msu.edu) (517-355-3304).

 

posted April 8, 2013 

Keyword: Great!
MSU MUSEUM’S 2013 GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL IS AUG. 9-11

The keyword is “great” for the MSU Museum's annual Great Lakes Folk Festival, set for Aug. 9-11 in downtown East Lansing.

The preliminary music and dance program includes
-Paulette Brockington | Swing Dance and the Lindy Hop | Highland Park, Mich. | Michigan Heritage Awardee and master artist presenting a participatory swing dance session
-Clear Fork Bluegrass Quartet | Bluegrass | Chardon, Ohio
-Dentdelion | Québécois | Sainte-Béatrix, Québec
-Kaivama | Finnish-American | Minneapolis, Minn.
-Johnny Koenig | Slovenian Polka | Allison Park, Penn.
-Lanialoha & Aloha Lives! | Hawai'ian Ukulele/Hula | Chicago
-Les Bassettes | Cajun | Lafayette, La.
-Lee Murdock | Kaneville, Ill. | a special repertoire in honor of the 75th anniversary of folklorist Alan Lomax collecting songs of Northern Michigan (in partnership with the Library of Congress American Folklife Center)
-Cathie Ryan | Irish-American Celtic | Hartsdale, N.Y.
-Tumbao Bravo | Cuban/Caribbean | Ann Arbor, Mich.
-Mai Zong Vue | Hmong Vocal Music | Madison, Wisc.

Dance Tent-Most groups play 2-4 times throughout the weekend, including sets on a 2,400-foot dance floor.
-Musicians from different groups take the stage in popular Traditions Showcases --  fiddlers, percussionists, accordion players -- to share and compare traditions and techniques of their instruments.
-Also, for festival-goers to participate: a musicians' jam and community sing.

A performance schedule will be set in July.

The award-winning Great Lakes Folk Festival, produced by the MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program, is a celebration of culture, tradition and community. The Michigan State University Museum works year-round to develop this festival program that reflects the immense variety and vitality of art, skill, knowledge, and wisdom of our cultural heritage for the public. GLFF offers a one-of-a-kind mix of music and dance stages, demonstrations of traditional arts and storytelling, authentic ethnic food, an arts marketplace, craft artists, and many special activities for kids and their companions.

Festival-goers appreciate the rich and authentic experience, promoting a greater understanding of diverse cultures and strengthening community with educational, entertaining and enduring programs. 

Great Lakes meets Midwest -- at the East Lansing epicenter
A special feature for 2013: GLFF plays host for the first time to the 13th traveling Midwest Folklife Festival, a free outdoor public festival that highlights the ethnic and folk arts, customs, and practices of the Midwestern states.

2013 Michigan Heritage Awards
Each year at GLFF, the MSU Museum presents the Michigan Heritage Awards recognizing the state’s leading tradition-bearers in music, material culture and community leadership.This year’s honorees are: Wesley V. Cooper of Fremont, a bamboo fishing rod maker, and Carlson's of Fishtown in Leland, a Great Lakes commercial fishing and fish processing.

Also on tap
The GLFF Marketplace returns with more recycled and upcycled green goods, from jewelry to garden and fiber art, and sculpture. The MSU Museum also showcases master artists in textiles, basketry and other traditional arts. (Attention prospective vendors: apply at zapplication.org; search for MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival.)

Children's activities include making traditional kids' crafts, games and pastimes, gardening projects, demonstrations by youth folk apprentices, MSU campus lore and traditions and more.

Taste of Traditions Foodways: with authentic regional and ethnic food - Greek, Indian, Mexican, Thai and more.

The festival site -- across the street from the MSU campus -- spans the downtown core of the city for three days of festival fun. 

Festival fast facts:
Festival hours are:  Friday, Aug. 9, 6 - 10:30 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 10, noon - 10:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 11, noon - 6 p.m.  For more information, call the MSU Museum at (517) 432-GLFF (4533). Connect with GLFF on facebook  and and twitter.

Admission is by donation (suggested $10 per day) and contributions leading up to the event and on-site --  sustain GLFF.  Festival friends can make donations leading up to the event online at greatlakesfolkfest.net or at the MSU Museum.

Parking is available in downtown ramps and across Grand River Avenue on the MSU campus (in designated areas; free on weekends). GLFF also provides bike parking on-site.

More than 400 agile volunteers assist the MSU Museum in staging the event - from artist transportation, children's activities, information booth, site set-up and teardown, ice delivery and visitor surveys.

The Great Lakes Folk Festival is presented by the Michigan State University Museum, Michigan's first Smithsonian affiliate. The MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program researches, documents, preserves, and presents our shared heritage and cultural expressions. Primary financial support for GLFF comes from Michigan State University Office of the Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, the National Endowment for the Arts, the City of East Lansing, and many MSU departments In addition, nearly 100 corporations, foundations and organizations also support GLFF annually, as well as individual donors, "Great Friends."

This award-winning event is one of the region's premiere arts programs and is expected to draw more than 90,000 visitors throughout the weekend to celebrate culture, tradition and community. GLFF was named the state's top public humanities program by the Michigan Humanities Council.

Arts and culture at Michigan State University:
Arts and culture at MSU play a critical role in nurturing the human spirit while contributing to a richer quality of life.  Museums, galleries, and gardens along with libraries, historic sites, and performance spaces provide a catalyst for cultural exchange of diverse ideas and inspirations.  At the same time, audiences on campus and around the world take advantage of academic and research outreach programs such as public broadcasting, online resources, and publications. Learn more at http://artsandculture.msu.edu .

 

-----------------------------------------------

NEA grants announced
MSU MUSEUM'S GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL EARNS NATIONAL 'ART WORKS' GRANT

National Endowment for the Arts Awards 832 Art Works Grants Totaling $23.3 million

National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Chairman Rocco Landesman announced this week that the NEA will award 832 grants totaling $23.3 million through its Art Works funding category. Not-for-profit arts organizations in 47 states plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico will receive funding. The supported projects span 13 artistic disciplines and fields and focus primarily on the creation of work and presentation of both new and existing works for the benefit of American audiences. In addition, the NEA will award Creative Writing Fellowships to 40 outstanding poets for a total of $1 million. This grant announcement is the first of several for fiscal year 2013.

"Through a rigorous peer-review panel process, the NEA ensures that projects recommended for funding are among the most creative, the most effective, and will make a real impact," said Landesman. "I am proud to announce these 832 Art Works grants and 40 Creative Writing Fellowships and I look forward to seeing the projects come to fruition for the benefit of both the grantees and their communities across the country."

Read the full announcement here.

The 2013 Great Lakes Folk Festival is Aug. 9-11 in downtown East Lansing, and is a three-day celebration of culture, tradition and community produced by the Michigan State University Museum.

posted 11/30/12

 

 

posted 8/23/12

 

Here's a slideshow compilation by long-time festival-goer Patrick Kerwin. He does a great job at capturing the culture, tradition and community that makes this event so special. Thanks, Pat! 

 

 

posted 8/13/12

THANKS, EVERYONE! WE HAD A GREAT TIME! 

There was so much going on throughout the streets of downtown East Lansing. Did you catch any of these programs? 

 

street scenes

 

posted 8/10/12

 

GLFF KICKS OFF FRIDAY, AUG. 10 WITH ZYDECO IN THE DANCE TENT!

 

Join us Friday, Aug. 10, at 6 p.m. as the MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival kicks off with MSU's own Sparty -- and the Cajun sounds of Leroy Thomas and the Zydeco Roadrunners in the Dance Tent in downtown East Lansing!
 
Friday night features a dazzling line-up of cultural expressions from across America and around the world: blues, bluegrass and old-time stringband, Irish Celtic, Dominican Merengue, Armenian, Indian, polka and more roots and rhythms. Thanks to the City of East Lansing for sponsoring the music program.
 
The Taste of Traditions foodways vendors will be open Friday night as well with authentic regional and ethnic food.
 
Marketplace and children's activities are in full swing beginning at 12 noon Saturday and Sunday, anchored at the Albert-Abbot intersection -- along with a new "Campus and Community" program, with exhibits and sessions exploring MSU's pioneering land-grant origins and building on that tradition through today's innovations. Learn more here:  
 
Check the schedule for performance times or get a printed program in Friday's Lansing State Journal.
 
Please give! Suggested donation is $10 per day, per person.
 
NOTES AND UPDATES:
-Most programs are under tented areas, so the event goes on rain or shine (except in the event of severe weather). For the open-air City Hall music stage, performances would be moved inside the Marriott, main floor.
 
-Change to the musical artist line-up: Warner Williams will be unable to perform at GLFF due to a health emergency. Bluesman James Mabry will fill in his sets with Jay Summerour. 
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posted 8/7/12

TRADITIONS SHOWCASES ALL THREE DAYS: PART MASTERY, PART MAGIC! 
 
Accordion Traditions - Friday, Aug. 10, 8 p.m., Abbot Stage
Featuring Bua's Brían Ó hAirt (Irish Celtic), Joaquín Díaz (Merengue)
and Leroy Thomas (Zydeco) Accordion Traditions will compare and
contrast accordion styles from Ireland, the Dominican Republic and
Louisiana.
 
From Blues to Bluegrass - Friday, Aug. 10, 9 p.m., Abbot Stage
Blues and Bluegrass have a bit more in common than you might think.
Warner WIlliams, Jay Summerour and Claire Lynch will talk about their
lives and careers playing two of our southern-born American
traditions.
 
 
Fiddle Traditions - Saturday, Aug. 11, 1 p.m., Abbot Stage
Always one of the Great Lakes Folk Festival's favorites, Fiddle
Traditions will compare and contrast fiddle styles as performed by
Bua's Devin Shepherd (Celtic), David Bass (Old-time) and Bryan
McDowell (Bluegrass), as well as the generational relationship of the
three styles.
 
 
String, Strang, Strung - Saturday, Aug. 11, 7:45 p.m., Abbot Stage
Many people think of folk music as a guitar and banjo and fiddle. And
while we certainly have plenty of those at the festival each year,
many cultures have found unique ways with which to produce sounds and
music... sometimes with but a string or two; sometimes with dozens of
strings. In this showcase, we will feature the Indian Sitar (Hasu
Patel), the Kamanche (Saeed Kamjoo), the Begena and Krar (Temesgen
Hussein) and the Kanun (Ara Topouzian).
 
 
Percussion Traditions - Sunday, Aug. 12, 12 noon, Abbot Stage
Guitars and fiddles and accordions often get most of the attention
while those that keep the beat are kept (often literally) in the
background. In this showcase, we will feature the Indian Tabla (Vishal
Nagar), the Iranian Daf and Tumbak (Mehdi Darvishi), Merengue Tambora
(Peter Barzey) and Guira (Raul Villa Rojas) and Zydeco Rubboard
(Charles Fontenot).
 
 
Airport Jam - Sunday. Aug. 12, 3 p.m., Abbot Stage 
It is not uncommon for musicians to cross paths in airports, and it's
very uncommon for musicians to not want to play music together when
they've got the chance. René Meave (Tex-Mex), Leroy Thomas (Zydeco),
Devin Shepherd (Irish Celtic) and Frank Lee (Old-Time) will each kick
off a tune and the rest will follow.

 

 

 

posted 7/20/12

 

GLFF news and updates
GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL SCHEDULE POSTED ONLINE

 

A tentative performance schedule for the MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival Aug. 10-12 is now posted online.
 
Again this year, GLFF is using the SCHED event organizer system. Go to the schedule page, click the schedule arrow for options: view the schedule by day, by stage, in list or grid, as well as in a printable format.
 
There's also a QR code to use with smart phones. A mobile-friendly version is available for iPhone, Android and Blackberry. Special thanks to MSU Office of Campus Sustainability for their sponsorship of the GLFF mobile web app.
 
 
LISTEN TO THE ROOTS AND RHYTHMS: MUSIC SAMPLES ONLINE
 
Visit the GLFF web site for newly posted music clips, featuring a fantastic line-up of musical traditions, including Celtic, bluegrass, Zydeco, Dominican, polka, Armenian, Indian, gospel and more roots and rhythms. Thanks to the City of East Lansing for sponsoring the music program.
 
Local radio stations are also planning to preview our musical program and other festival activities. Tune in to WMMQ/94.9 and the Capitol City Blues Cruise with Scotty Allman, Sundays, 7-9 p.m.; WDBM/88.9 and Progressive Torch & Twang, Tuesdays, 8 p.m. - midnight; and WLNZ/89.7, Michigan Music Box, Thursdays at 7 p.m. and Saturdays at 3 p.m.

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posted 6/28/12

 

 

CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY' ON OUR NATION'S 'FRONT LAWN'... AND EAST LANSING
 
MSU Museum and GLFF curators are working right now at the Smithsonian's annual Folklife Festival, which has a focus on "Campus and Community" for its educational exhibits. The Smithsonian event, on the nation's "front lawn," in Washington, D.C., goes on through July 8. Next up, we'll adapt it for an exhibit at GLFF, Aug. 10-12.
 
Read more from MSU Museum News.
####
 
 
CHILDREN'S FOLK ACTIVITIES AREA TAKES SHAPE:
 
Drawing on the Smithsonian’s "Campus and Community" theme, GLFF children's activities will explore campus lore and MSU traditions, including
-Painting "the Rock"
-Planting a small 4-H Pizza Garden
-Decorating a heritage tree to honor family members
-Building a homecoming float for the 2012 fall parade
The MSU Dairy Store will also be on hand! The "Campus and Community" program and children's activities take place Saturday and Sunday at GLFF, 12 p.m. - 6 p.m., and are primarily on and around Abbot Road -- across from City Hall.
 
 
 
2012 MICHIGAN HERITAGE AWARDS
 
2012 Michigan Heritage Awardees will be honored at GLFF on Sunday, Aug. 12, at 3:30 p.m. The Michigan Heritage Award is the state's highest distinction to honor individuals who continue their family community and cultural traditions with excellence and devotion.
 
-Johnnie Bassett, Oak Park (Oakland County), Blues guitar and vocals
-Paulette Brockington, Highland Park (Wayne County), Swing dance and Lindy hop
-The Ship's Company, Friends Good Will, South Haven (Van Buren County), marlinespike seamanship
-René Meave and Guillermo Martinez, Plainwell (Allegan County) and Kalamazoo (Kalamazoo County), Tejano music (Michigan-style)
 
Read more from the MSU Museum
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BE GREAT, VOLUNTEER!
The Michigan State University Museum is looking for volunteers to help at the Great Lakes Folk Festival (GLFF) in Aug. 10-12 in downtown East Lansing.
 
Volunteer positions include festival set-up and takedown, bike parking, assisting in the children's area, staffing the information booth and GLFF marketplace, and collecting donations in the "bucket brigade." More than 400 volunteers are needed to help produce the event. Most volunteer shifts are three hours long.
 
The Great Lakes Folk Festival is the MSU Museum's annual arts and culture festival, showcasing the best in traditional music, authentic food and handmade crafts from across the country and the world.
For more information on positions and volunteering, visit the Great Lakes Folk Festival's volunteer page at or email glffvolunteer@museum.msu.edu.
 
 
AND DONATE!
Please donate to help sustain our folk festival programs! We depend on a diverse mix of funding -- from national and state grants, to MSU departments, to businesses and corporate partnerships, and Great Friends, like you!
 
Make a gift online: Donate Here from the main page!
####
 
 
 
NEW 'GREAT FOLKS' BLOG
 
Michigan State University Museum has launched GREAT FOLKS! - a new blog dedicated to expanding the community of tradition bearers and those who want to learn more about the music, stories, dance, foodways, art and cultural heritage of Michigan and beyond.  Bob Blackman, long-time host of WKAR's "Folk Tradition" will blog, along with a team of MSU Museum contributors committed to sharing news and information, and more traditional arts activities and resources of the MSU Museum and other organizations around the state.
 
The blog is sponsored by the Michigan State University Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program, a partnership with the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.
 
Follow it here.
####
 
 
CONSTRUCTION IN EAST LANSING THIS SUMMER; ADAPTING OUR GLFF SITE
 
We'll be working around some major construction projects in downtown East Lansing this summer, so don't be surprised to see a few changes in our festival site.
 
Everything's there, but we'll be moving west and north to accommodate the projects that are anchored around the intersection of Albert and MAC. If you attended the East Lansing Art Festival a few weeks ago, we'll have a pretty similar layout.
 
The main changes you'll notice: our main open-air music stage will be in the City Hall Parking Lot, off Abbot road. (Bonuses will be some tree cover and a grass berm!)
 
Also, the Children's Folk Activities Area will be across the street from City Hall, also off Abbot Road.
 
Check out the tentative site map.
 
 

 

posted 5/3/12

 

MSU MUSEUM SEEKS ARTISTS, VENDORS FOR GLFF MARKETPLACE, AUG. 10-12
Marketplace - chicken
The Michigan State University Museum is seeking traditional arts and “green” artists and vendors of “green” lifeways products for its annual Great Lakes Folk Festival, Aug. 10-12 in downtown East Lansing.
 
Curated by the MSU Museum staff, the marketplace will be limited to 60 artists and vendors who meet the criteria for a traditional/folk or green artist. Folk or traditional art is generally learned by example from a family or community member, through imitation and repetition, rather than through formal instruction such as classes or workshops. Traditional art, as practiced by ethnic, regional, occupational, familial, and religious groups, refers to the traditional expressions through which these communities maintain and pass on their shared sense of beauty, identity, and values. Green artists take used or recycled materials and upcycle them to make art or functional objects. The products convey the artists' wisdom, skill and creativity for conserving the planet and using materials in a sometimes recognizable, and sometimes surprising way.
 
New this year: interested vendors should go to zapplication.org and search for MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival. ZAPP is an online application system that allows artists to upload high-resolution digital images of their artwork and apply to participate in juried art shows, festivals and fairs. The application deadline is June 15, 2012.
 
The Great Lakes Folk Festival showcases the traditional cultural treasures of the nation's Upper Midwest and a sampling of the best of traditional artists from around the country and the world. The festival encourages cross-cultural understanding of our diverse society through the presentation of musicians, dancers, cooks, storytellers and craftspeople whose traditions are rooted in their communities. The festival includes nearly 100 musicians or dancers in groups, who perform at least twice and sometimes as many as four times over the weekend. Also featured are traditional and other food vendors, craft vendors and many other individual artists/demonstrators. There are four performance stages, a children's hands-on activity area, demonstration area, and the folk arts marketplace. In addition there are special programs every year, which feature some aspect of traditional culture. This year's special program is Campus and Community.
 
Festival hours are:  Friday, Aug. 10, 6 - 10:30 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 11, noon - 10:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 12, noon - 6 p.m. For more information, call the MSU Museum at (517) 432-GLFF (4533)  and on Facebook and Twitter  (twitter.com/GLFF).
 
The Great Lakes Folk Festival is presented by the Michigan State University Museum, Michigan's first Smithsonian affiliate. The MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program researches, documents, preserves, and presents our shared heritage and cultural expressions.

Photo by Pearl Yee Wong, MSU Museum. 

 

posted 4/12/12

MORE ECLECTIC THAN EVER FOR MSU MUSEUM’S 2012 GREAT LAKES FOLK FESTIVAL, AUG. 10-12 

The MSU Museum's Great Lakes Folk Festival has always been known as an eclectic collection of music, dance, arts and culture from across America and around the world, and the 2012 program is shaping up to be one of the most diverse in the event’s history. The event is set for Aug. 10-12 in downtown East Lansing, and aptly enough, this university-city partnership takes on the educational program theme, “Campus and Community,” developed jointly with the Smithsonian Institution.

The music program features Celtic, bluegrass, a cappella gospel, Zydeco, and the contrasting stringed instruments sounds from the Armenian kanun, Ethiopian begena, and Indian sitar. Musical artists perform two to four times throughout the weekend, so visitors have a chance to see the bands they like and discover new genres.  The preliminary 2012 line-up, sponsored by the City of East Lansing, is:

-Denny Anderson and The International Main Street Polka Band -- Polka, Brooklyn Park, Minnesota

-Bua -- Irish-American Celtic, Chicago, Illinois

-Joaquin Diaz, Dominican Merengue, Montreal, Canada

-Freight Hoppers | Old-Time String Band | Bryson City, North Carolina 

-Claire Lynch -- Bluegrass, Heritage, Tennessee

-Northern Kentucky Brotherhood Singers -- A Cappella Gospel, Covington, Kentucky

-Hasu Patel -- Indian Sitar, Westlake, Ohio

-Temesgen -- Ethiopian Begena and Krar, East Lansing, Michigan

-Leroy Thomas and the Zydeco Roadrunners -- Zydeco, Elton, Louisiana

-Ara Topouzian -- Armenian Kanun, Bloomfield, Michigan

-Warner Williams (2011 National Heritage Fellow) & Jay Summerour --
Piedmont Blues, Gaithersburg and North Potomac, Maryland

-Traditions Showcases- On stage sessions that include, 3 to 5 musicians, from several bands, who compare styles, history and technique.  Past Showcases have included fiddle, guitar, accordion, family band and more.

-Also, for festival-goers to participate: an Old Time musicians’ jam and community sing.

Meanwhile, the MSU Museum’s annual Michigan Heritage Awards will enrich the music program at GLFF with three of four 2012 honorees recognized for music and dance traditions and expected to perform:

-Johnnie Bassett, Blues Guitar and Vocals, Oak Park, Michigan

-Paulette Brockington, Swing Dance and the Lindy Hop, Highland Park, Michigan

-Rene Meave and Guillermo Martinez (founders of Los Bandits), Michigan-style Tejano, Kalamazoo, Michigan

[-The fourth MHA honoree is The Ship’s Company, Friends Good Will, of South Haven, for marlinespike seamanship, or ropework and knot-tying.]

A performance schedule will be set in July.

The award-winning Great Lakes Folk Festival, produced by the MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program, is a celebration of culture, tradition and community. The Michigan State University Museum works year-round to develop this festival program that reflects the immense variety and vitality of art, skill, knowledge, and wisdom of our cultural heritage for the public. GLFF offers a one-of-a-kind mix of music and dance stages, demonstrations of traditional arts and storytelling, authentic ethnic food, an arts marketplace, craft artists, and many special activities for kids and their companions.

“Festival-goers appreciate the rich and authentic experience, and often note how the event promotes a greater understanding of diverse cultures, how it brings people together, and how it strengthens community in the way the programs resonate and endure,” observes Marsha MacDowell, founding director and MSU Museum curator of folk arts.

 

‘Campus and Community’:

This year’s theme for GLFF educational programs and exhibits is “Campus and Community,” an adaptation of a special program to be presented at the 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. MSU Museum curators are working with the Smithsonian to develop a program that will debut on the national mall and next come to East Lansing, revolving around the 150th anniversary of public and land-grant universities, as well as the USDA. The program highlights how universities, like MSU, work in communities reinventing agriculture, developing sustainable solutions, transforming communities and building on tradition.  “Campus and Community:  Public and Land-grant Universities and the USDA at 150” is produced in partnership with the Association of State and Public Universities and the United States Department of Agriculture.

The Great Lakes Folk Festival Marketplace returns with more recycled and upcycled green goods, from jewelry to garden and fiber art, and sculpture. The MSU Museum also showcases master artists in textiles, basketry and other traditional arts.

Also on tap:

Children's activities include making traditional kids' crafts, games and pastimes, gardening projects, demonstrations by youth folk apprentices, MSU campus lore and traditions and more.

Taste of Traditions Foodways: with authentic regional and ethnic food - Greek, Indian, Mexican, Thai and more.

The festival site -- across the street from the MSU campus -- spans the downtown core of the city for three days of festival fun. Find out more at http://greatlakesfolkfest.net or follow GLFF on facebook and twitter.

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Festival fast facts:

Festival hours are:  Friday, Aug. 10, 6 - 10:30 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 11, noon - 10:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Aug. 12, noon - 6 p.m For more information, call the MSU Museum at (517) 432-GLFF (4533) or learn more at http://www.greatlakesfolkfest.net  and on facebook (Great Lakes Folk Festival) and twitter  (twitter.com/GLFF).

Admission is by donation (suggested $10 per day) and contributions leading up to the event and on-site --  sustain GLFF.

Parking is available in downtown ramps and across Grand River Avenue on the MSU campus (in designated areas; free on weekends). GLFF also provides bike parking on-site, as well as CATA bus services from off-site lots at MSU (Lot 91 at Hagadorn and Service roads) and in East Lansing (Abbot Center at Saginaw and Abbot roads).

More than 400 agile volunteers assist the MSU Museum in staging the event - from artist transportation, children's activities, information booth, site set-up and teardown, ice delivery and visitor surveys.

The Great Lakes Folk Festival is presented by the Michigan State University Museum, Michigan's first Smithsonian affiliate. The MSU Museum's Michigan Traditional Arts Program researches, documents, preserves, and presents our shared heritage and cultural expressions. Primary financial support for GLFF comes from the City of East Lansing, Michigan State University Office of the Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, the National Endowment for the Arts, and many MSU departments.  In addition, nearly 100 corporations, foundations and organizations also support GLFF annually, as well as individual donors, "Great Friends."

This award-winning event is one of the region's premiere arts programs and is expected to draw more than 90,000 visitors throughout the weekend to celebrate culture, tradition and community. GLFF was named the state's top public humanities program by the Michigan Humanities Council.

Arts and culture at Michigan State University:
Arts and culture at MSU play a critical role in nurturing the human spirit while contributing to a richer quality of life.  Museums, galleries, and gardens along with libraries, historic sites, and performance spaces provide a catalyst for cultural exchange of diverse ideas and inspirations.  At the same time, audiences on campus and around the world take advantage of academic and research outreach programs such as public broadcasting, online resources, and publications. Learn more at http://artsandculture.msu.edu .
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posted 4/12/12

MSU MUSEUM HELPS CRAFT 'CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY' PROGRAM AT SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL, GLFF 

 

In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed legislation to establish the land-grant university system and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Today, the land-grant mission of “knowledge with public purpose,” is evident in research, learning and community engagement projects that make the world safer, healthier and more sustainable. The 2012 Folklife Festival program “Campus and Community: Public and Land-grant Universities and the USDA at 150” celebrates 150 years of partnership between universities, the USDA and communities. 
 
The Festival takes place Wednesday, June 27, through Sunday, July 1, and Wednesday, July 4, through Sunday, July 8, outdoors on the National Mall between Seventh and 14th streets. All events are free. Festival hours are 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day, with special evening events such as concerts and dance parties beginning at 5:30 p.m. The Festival is co-sponsored by the National Park Service.
 
“Campus and Community” will focus on four themes that reflect the current work of public and land-grant universities and the USDA: reinventing agriculture, sustainable solutions, transforming communities and building on tradition. Each theme area of the program will allow visitors to interact with university and USDA staff, professors, students and community members highlighting exciting research and engagement projects. From master gardeners to Hawaiian traditional healing, from managing invasive species to helping communities recover from natural disasters, the program will cover an array of ways universities and the USDA put research to action every day.  
 
The program will also feature Smithsonian U., where visitors can listen to short informative talks by master teachers; the Test Kitchen, which will include cooking demonstrations using ingredients raised or researched at agricultural experiment stations; The Commons, an area promoting dialogue about important issues affecting universities, the USDA and communities; The Justin S. Morrill Performing Arts Center, a large stage where student groups and other regional groups will showcase world class music and dance, from mariachi to Hawaiian hula; the Learning Laboratory Family Activities Center, where families can experience hands-on art and science activities; and Alumni Hall, an area for graduates of public and land-grant universities and USDA programs to reconnect with each other and share memories. Visitors will also be able to visit the Festival Marketplace to purchase crafts, food items and popular books and recordings relating to the universities and the USDA. 
 
More than 25 land-grant and public universities will participate in this year’s Festival, including consortia of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Tribal Colleges in the land-grant system, and Hispanic Serving Institutions. 
 
C. Kurt Dewhurst, director of arts and cultural initiatives for UO&E and curator of folklife and cultural heritage at the MSU Museum, is co-curating the "Campus and Community" program. The Smithsonian program will be recreated on a smaller scale as a featured part of the MSU Museum's 2012 Great Lakes Folk Festival, Aug. 10-12 in downtown East Lansing. The MSU Museum is Michigan's first Smithsonian affiliate.
 
Learn more here.
 
Sponsors
“Campus and Community: Public and Land-grant Universities and the USDA at 150” is produced in partnership with the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Participating Universities include the University of California, Davis; the University of Florida; the University of Hawaii; the University of Illinois; Indiana University; Iowa State University; the University of Maryland; Michigan State University; Mississippi State University; the University of Missouri; Montana State University; Oregon State University; the University of Tennessee, Texas A&M University; Washington State University and West Virginia University. The University of Vermont is a Contributing University. 
 
About the Festival
The Smithsonian Folklife Festival, inaugurated in 1967, honors tradition bearers from across the United States and around the world. With approximately 1 million visitors each year, the Festival unites performers and visitors in the nation’s capital to celebrate the diversity of cultural traditions. It is produced by the Smithsonian’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. The Festival’s website is www.festival.si.edu.